Institute of Machine Learning at Adelaide University a computer vision world leader

Visual question answering is one of the themes pursued by the Australian Institute for Machine Learning at Adelaide University.
Image courtesy University of Adelaide

The Australian Institute for Machine Learning, one of six research institutes at the University of Adelaide, is a world leader in computer vision. With more than 100 researchers, it’s the largest Australian university-based research group in machine learning. 

Its work follows four themes:

• theory of machine learning (artificial intelligence that enables computers and machines to autonomously learn how to do complex tasks without being overtly programmed),

* trusted autonomous systems (able to make explainable decisions, intelligently controlling autonomous vehicles, asking questions when uncertain about decisions and applying reasoning to their surrounds),

*robotic vision (giving machines the ability to “see” and understand the physical world, using camera hardware and computer algorithms) and

• visual question answering (enabling computers to give natural-language answers to natural- language questions about the content of visual images.)

The Australian Institute for Machine Learning (AIML) was officially established in 2018 with investment from the South Australian government and the university. But the institute was formed from the university’s Australian Centre for Visual Technologies, that had a long history of delivering high-impact fundamental and applied research. Its many years of success and experience has formed the core of what is now known as AIML. 

Machine learning underpins the business models of the largest corporations and has the potential to deliver major social, economic and environmental benefits and impact on area including health, education and finance. Adelaide University AIML’s world-class research strengths lie in machine learning and the methods – artificial intelligence, computer vision and deep learning – that support this.

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