University of Adelaide is consistently ranked in the top 1% worldwide.
 

FOUR NOBEL WINNERS SYMBOLISE STRONG FOCUS ON SCIENCE/RESEARCH shared by
Adelaide, South Australia, Flinders universities

 

THE THREE MAIN SOUTH AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES – Adelaide, Flinders and UniSA – have been beacons of science and research.

Adelaide, the third oldest Australian university, is consistently ranked in the top 1% worldwide. It is associated with four science Nobel laureates and 104 Rhodes scholars.

The university has five campuses: the main one on North Terrace in the city, with the others at Roseworthy agricultural college; the Waite Institute at Urrbrae; Thebarton research park; and the National Wine Centre in the city parklands. A sixth campus, the Ngee Ann – Adelaide Education Centre (NAAEC) is in Singapore.

It is one of Australia’s most research-intensive universities across a range including agriculture, environment, mineral and energy resources, social innovation, health and biomedical science and sensing and computation.

Flinders University is a member of the Innovative Research Universities Group. Its science schools cover biology, chemical and physical sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics and environment. Its new campus at Tonsley in 2015 added a centre for nanoscale science and technology.

The University of South Australia is a public research university.  It was formed in 1991 with the merger of the South Australian Institute of Technology (1889) and College of Advanced Education (1956), combining more than 150 years of teaching and research history.

With more than 32,000 students, the university is South Australia's largest; more than 6,000 students are international, with almost half studying in Adelaide and the remainder offshore.

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