BiobiN® for composting, developed by South Australia's Peats Soils, being taken up overseas

The internal air flow of Peats Soils' BiobiN® unit to compost organic material.
Image courtesy Peats Soil and Garden Supplies.

BiobiN® is an onsite capture-and-contain system to start composting organic material in an odour-free easily-accessible unit. BiobiN® was developed by Adelaide company Peats Soil and Garden Supplies, led by Peter Wadewitz, a leading recycler of organic material in South Australia, to reverse the large amounts of organic and wet materials being sent to landfill.

For more than four decades, Peats have been turning what others perceive as “waste” into valuable nutrient- rich products and showing the way to a circular economy. The BiobiN® provides a cost-effective and sustainable solution for organic waste generated around the world. It is being used to process organic and wet materials in Australasia, North America, the Middle East, Japan, China and India. Its suitable for a whole range of outlets: hotels, resorts, restaurants, schools, hospitals, food factories and farms.

The patented BiobiN® aeration system initiates a composting that cuts bacteria and other pathogens. The composting process also maximises the amount of organic material that can be collected by the BiobiN®. Once collected, the processed or partially processed organic material can be added to products such as soil conditioners, compost and biofuels – providing valuable nutrients, carbon and organic matter to agricultural soils, landscape supplies and alternative fuels.

Peats Soils has bases outside Adelaide in Dublin, Willunga and Brinkley, near Langhorne Creek. In 2019, its fourth advanced compost and renewable energy site opened at Whyalla City Council’s Mount Laura Waste and Resource Recovery Centre, with the help of regional funding from the Australian government. The plant will digest waste to produce Biogas for sale into the electricity grid and a compost product that can be sold to surrounding agricultural markets to improve soil and enhance its carbon.

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