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Volunteers rescue gems of aviation history – and rockets, too – for their Port Adelaide museum

South Australian Aviation Museum in Lipson Street, Port Adelaide, displays aircraft and aircraft engines relevant to South Australian/Australian aviation. It also has the Defence Science and Technology Organisation's collection of 1950-80 heritage rockets from the Woomera test range in the state’s north. The museum originated from the South Australian Aviation & Warbirds Restoration Group in 1984. The museum volunteers have made many notable rescues of historic aircraft, such as a Macchi MB326H twin seater jet trainer destined to be used for target practice at an artillery range at Port Wakefield. In 2016, a retired RAAF Caribou transport plane has found a new home at the museum after a three-month journey through the outback. The aircraft, made by Hawker de Havilland, is one of 29 that were used in Australia from the mid-1960s. Its final voyage covered hundreds of kilometres on the back of a truck from Queensland to South Australia, including along the remote and dusty Strzelecki Track. Caribous were flown for about 45 years and they were used in Vietnam, right through [Papua] New Guinea, humanitarian relief work through Asia, Australia, for droughts. With its short takeoff and landing, it had a great capability for landing on rough runways. Among its museum’s volunteers has been Alan Killmier, a founder of the Gliding and Soaring Club of SA. He became a joint holder of Australian gliding distance record of 632km over nine hours from Gawler to Strathmerton in northern Victoria.
 

DC-3 Irene restored by South Australian farmer after many lives – even kids' party room

A Douglas DC-3 aircraft, nicknamed Irene, has been returned to its original state after many lives, including several in South Australia. Built in Long Beach, California, in 1942, the C-47 military (or Gooney Bird) version of the DC-3 operated mainly as a “biscuit bomber” (dropping supplies) around New Guinea and north Queensland in World War II. Named after the crew chief’s wife, it became a civilian aircraft in 1945 and leased to the Adelaide-based Guinea Airways. The transfer toTrans-Australia Airlines in 1946 started a string of different operators and names. Its adventures included being the first taking evacuees out of Darwin after Cyclone Tracy in 1974, a crash landing in lake on the East Lakes Golf Course in New South Wales, wearing the fictitious title “Banana Airlines” for a film appearance, and flying fish from Tasmania across Bass Strait to Essendon. Decommissioned in 1983, Irene was sold to McDonalds Family Restaurants who had her restored and refurbished by North-West Airlines and repainted in the old TAA livery. Adelaide West Lakes McDonald’s franchisee Ross Halliday bought the plane as a dining room and children’s party space in the 1980s/90s and it was a huge winner. When that era passed, Irene was put up for sale and was grabbed in 2000 by aviation enthusiast and pilot Jeff Morgan who took her to his South Australian Mallee farm where he spent many hours eliminating corrosion and then sourcing parts to bring the engines back to life. The cockpit has been restored and fully operating. Irene is sporting its US wartime livery with her name on it again.

Guinea Airways losses shrugged off with its skills consolidated at Adelaide's Parafield

Guinea Airways added a larger Lockheed 14H (Super Electra) aircraft to its three Lockheed 10As in 1938 to cope with demand for the service from Adelaide’s Parafield airport to Darwin. It was bought by the Adelaide airline for £23,000 and assembled in its Parafield hangar. Parafield maintenance crew, under chief engineer Jack Gething and foreman Percy Stone, kept the Darwin service running efficiently despite the problem of dust in the engines. Guinea’s first major accident was at Katherine in 1939 when VH-ABI was destroyed. It led to a takeoff path of at least 1,200 yards, compared to Katherine’s mere 700 yards. Guinea has another of its 10As chartered by the commonwealth civil aviation department to check the new Lorenz beacon system for major air routes. To cover its losses, Guinea chartered two Douglas DC-2s from Australian National Airlines (ANA) and still made an increased profit of £16,285 that year. It also took over three-times weekly services to Port Lincoln, Cleve and Kangaroo Island from ANA and added a flight to Whyalla. After another Lockheed 10A was lost to a crash and fire south of Darwin, Guinea obtained two Lockheed L14s from Irish airline Aer Lingus Teoranta. When the British government demanded £18,000 duty while they were in the UK waiting to be transported to Australia, Guinea avoided this by sending two pilots to fly them out from Ireland in May 1940 and arriving at Parafield on June 9, in a record 65 hours. The planes – Darwin and Adelaide – were added to the Darwin route.

Guinea Airways sets up Adelaide to Darwin passenger and airmail service from 1937

Adelaide-based Guinea Airways helped usher in a new era in Australian aviation when it bought two American Lockheed 10A (Electra) aircraft in 1936. Guinea’s VH-UXH was the first Lockheed of its type in Australia. With Australian National Airways’ (ANA) Douglas DC-2, it was the start of fast all-metal aircraft. (ANA emerged later in 1936 from Adelaide Steamship company’s Adelaide Airways merger with Holyman Airways.) Guinea’s VH-UXH was assembled in Adelaide Airways’ Parafield airport hangar.  VH-UXH (able to carry 10 passengers) went to New Guinea, operated as part of its Adelaide parent company’s gold mining. It also did charter flights to Australia, including one to the Melbourne Cup. When Guinea Airways decided the VH-UXH wasn’t suited to New Guinea conditions, it was ferried back to Parafield in 1937 and used to survey a route to Darwin. A weekly service to Darwin started in 1937, carrying mail on a two-day trip, with stops at Maree, Oodnadatta, Alice Springs (overnight), Tennant Creek, Daly Waters and Katherine. In 1937, VH-UXH was chartered by Melbourne Sun newspaper to meet the first England-Australia airmail aircraft arriving in Darwin with photos and details of the coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. Charter work for Guinea Airways increased, enabling it to build a large hangar at Parafield. By 1937, Guinea had three 10A Lockheeds on the  twice-a-week service to/from Parafield to Darwin. This became three flights when it won the government airmail contract to connect with Qantas/Imperial flying boat service to the United Kingdom.

 

Thomas Gale's first balloon flight over Adelaide in June 1871 has a romantic sequel

Lavinia Balford of Parkside was the first South Australian female to ascend in a balloon when American Thomas Gale brought his machine, the Young Australian, to Adelaide in 1871. Gale’s first flight attempt on Tuesday, June 20, when the balloon only half inflated, left 20,000 onlookers in the Adelaide parklands “disappointed if not disgusted”, according to the Southern Argus – especially the 500 who bought tickets to watch it rise from the grounds of the Exhibition Building, North Terrace. Gale blamed the failure on a narrow coal gas pipe. The South Australian Gas Company came to the rescue with a thicker pipe for another attempt on the Saturday at the cattle yards on western North Terrace opposite Newmarket Hotel. By 2pm, the Register reported, several hundred spectators had paid for admission within the enclosure, and several thousand assembled on North Terrace and nearby parklands. Schrader’s band played “most excellent music”. While they waited for enough wind for the flight, the balloon “gave a lift” to 30 or 40 people to the height of the 60m tether rope. Lavinia Balford was among them. Gale’s first full flight took place at 4.15. His companion was theatre impresario Samuel Lazar, later Adelaide mayor. Lazar threw out copies of the Register to mark the route of his flight that ended near Thorndon Park Reservoir. Over the next few weeks Gale took many more passengers up in Young Australian. He opened the way for many similar balloon events in Adelaide’s parklands. Gale never left Adelaide. He married Lavinia Balford and lived in Parkside for the rest of his life.

Guinea becomes the Airlines of South Australia in 1960 after takeover by Ansett

Adelaide’s Guinea Airways' colourful life ended in 1960 when its name was changed to Airlines of South Australia, owned by Ansett Airlines. In 1958-59, Guinea had leased a Convair 240-5 from federal government owned Trans-Australia Airlines (TAA) for its Broken Hill route, and TAA became Guinea’s agency when Adelaide operations were transferred from Parafield to the new Brooklyn Park airport in 1955. Guinea’s Convair was replaced by F27 Friendship, also leased from TAA, that worked with Guinea’s DC-3s. In 1957, TAA’s rival Australian National Airways (ANA) was taken over by Ansett. It also took over Guinea in 1959. All Guinea aircraft  – five DC-3s and an Auster – were transferred to the new Ansett-owned Airlines of South Australia, that added a 52-seat Convair 440. Airlines of South Australia had services from Adelaide to Port Lincoln, Minnipa, Ceduna, Cowell, Cleve, Kimba, Radium Hill, Broken Hill, Kangaroo Island, Port Pirie, Whyalla, Renmark, Mildura and Woomera. In the 1960s, services were added briefly to Naracoorte, Millicent and tours to Queensland’s Haysman island while other services were cut. A Piaggo 166 and Fokker F-27 Friendships replaced older aircraft. In 1968, Airlines of South Australia was renamed Ansett Airlines of SA. By 1973, the fleet was down to three Fokker F-27s. In the 1970s, Ansett Airlines of SA tried special-interest weekend flights and began services to Mount Gambier.  In 1980, a route sharing began with Rossair and in 1981 Ansett reverted to the Airlines of South Australia name. With more competition in 1970s/80s, Ansett in 1985 announced another subsidiary Kendell Airlines would move onto South Australian routes. In 1986, Airlines of South Australia ended with a flight to Whyalla.

ANA and government's new TAA airline put squeeze on Adelaide's Guinea from late 1940s

The end of World War II brought new pressures for Adelaide’s Guinea Airways. It sold off several aircraft and was left with two Lockheed 10As, a Lockheed 14WF62 and two Douglas C-50s. It leased or bought 11 DC-3s in 1945. At the company’s annual general meeting that year, with profit at £8,659, shareholders rejected a merger with Australian National Airways (ANA) and the directors (including original chairman C.T.V. Wells) were replaced. During that year, Guinea and ANA agreed to share staff and the hangar at Parafield airport but Guinea's operations were to be under the control of ANA at Essendon in Victoria. About 120 Guinea maintenance staff at Parafield were retrenched. Guinea also soon lost 10 senior pilots to the federal government’s new Trans Australia Airlines (TAA). The federal government in 1945 had set up the Australian Airlines Commission. It refused Guinea permission to resume services in New Guinea. In 1947, Guinea sold its two Lockheed 10A aircraft. Its Lockheed 14H was leased to ANA for the Brisbane-Cairns route, then became a standby aircraft at Parafield airport, before being withdrawn from services, left in the open for two years and sold to Sims Metals for scrap in 1951. Although its profit was up in 1947, Guinea ended its Darwin service that year after it lost the Darwin mail contract to TAA. That left Guinea with services to Ceduna, Whyalla (via Port Pirie), Broken Hill, Port Lincoln and Kangaroo Island plus charter work for the Weapons Research Establishment at Salisbury from 1951. 

Major support work for RAAF carried out by Adelaide's Guinea Airways during WWII

Adelaide’s Guinea Airways did charter work for Australian defence forces in the Pacific phase of World War II. A Fox Moth aircraft, bought from Goldfields Airways in Kalgoorlie, and adding to Guinea’s two Lockheed 14Hs and two Lockheed 10As, was used extensively in charter work. In 1942, Guinea did extend its passenger services with the Parafield-Renmark-Broken Hill route. Also during the war, Guinea was contacted to do major servicing of Royal Australian Air Force planes at Parafield. It also did DH Gypsy and Armstrong Siddeley Cheetah engine maintenance at a complex built at Cavan in Adelaide’s northern suburbs, with a staff of 60. The wartime Allied Directorate of Air Transport (ADAT) allotted Guinea three ex-Netherland East Indies Lockheed aircraft that operated on ADAT’s behalf in United States military colours. One was used extensively for defence charters in New Guinea and Queensland. War needs increased Darwin services to six a week and RAAF pilots helped fly Guinea planes. They included sergeant Des Gillespie – later chief pilot for Airlines of South Australia. War demands took a damage toll on Guinea aircraft and its engineers at Parafield. Guinea bought its two Douglas DC-3 in 1944 but lost a de Havilland DH.89 Dragon Rapide biplane in a crash on Mount Kitchener in the Barossa Valley. Near war's end, ex-RAAF pilots became available to Guinea as captains. Guinea operations manager Eric Chaseling died in 1944, aged 48, of lung cancer contracted while test flying in the US. His ashes were scattered over Parafield from Guinea’s Lockheed 10A VH-UXH, the C.J. Levien.

 

Guinea Airways born in 1926 from Adelaide investors' backing for New Guinea gold mine

Guinea Airways emerged from an airline formed in Adelaide in 1926 to carry freight as part of its parent company's gold-mining operations in New Guinea. The Bulolo area in Papua New Guinea, 64 kilometres inland from Lae, was, before World War I, in German New Guinea. Several Australian miners, looking for gold, had crossed into the German colony but, after the war, it became an Australian mandate and many prospectors made fortunes there. One of these was Cecil John Levien. He believed in the district’s potential and, in 1926, at a meeting in Adelaide arranged by his friend W.P. A. Lapthorne, other Adelaide businessmen also offered support. They formed a company, Guinea Gold No Liability,  to test the Bulolo Flats. As the operation grew, Levien saw that the only way to effectively mine the gold in reasonable quantities was to use dredges to be carried over impenetrable jungles and steep mountains by aeroplanes. To be able also to carry passengers plus carry freight, Guinea Gold in 1927 registered Guinea Airways Ltd and commissioned one regular plane. Guinea Airways’ Adelaide directors were C.V.T. Wells, WPA Lapthorne, G. Jeffery, A. Scarfe and Levien. By 1928, Guinea Gold had spent £45,000 on New Guinea operations including the air service, testing its Bulolo South leases, marking the Koranga lease and set up a field organisation. The goldfields continued to prosper with annual production, running into millions of pounds, sent to the Australian mints. Guinea Gold later had less interest in practical mining and more with options, leases and dividends. It wound up in 1968.

 

Parafield Airport from 1927 becomes central to companies setting up interstate services

Parafield Airport opened in 1927 on the day after Harry Butler’s former Albert Park (Hendon) aerodrome closed. Adelaide-based pilot Horrie Miller’s Miller Aviation Company (later MacRobertson Miller Airways in Western Australia) and Australian Aerial Services moved from Albert Park to Parafield, as Adelaide’s interstate links increased. In 1929, two De Havilland Hercules Airlines, carrying 21 passengers, arrived from Perth on the first flight of the East-West Service. Sixteen aircraft landed in the East-West Air Race from Sydney to Perth – won by Horrie Miller in his DH9 G-AUHT. Adelaide Steamship Company announced the new Adelaide Airways in 1935, with flights from Parafield to Port Lincoln and Kangaroo Island. A Short Scion and a G.A.L. Monospar were ordered. Adelaide Airways started its Parafield–Mount Gambier–Melbourne route with the Short Scion VH-UUT. Australian National Airways formed in 1936 with passengers flying from Parafield to Perth, Melbourne and Sydney as well as country centres in South Australia. During World War II, Parafield Airport was used by the RAAF as a training unit using mainly Tiger Moth aircraft, with an occasional heavier general service aircraft such as the Liberator Bomber. After the war, the airfield plus many buildings were handed back to the federal civil aviation department and it operated as the city's only civil airport until Adelaide Airport at Brooklyn Park was opened in 1955.

Adelaide Steamship's Adelaide Airways starts chain of mergers that lead to Ansett-ANA

Adelaide Airways was formed as a subsidiary of the Adelaide Steamship Company in 1935, operating out of Parafield airport. Its fleet had different aircraft, including the Short Scion, the General Aircraft Monospar ST-25  and the De Havilland DH.89A. In 1936, Adelaide Airways bought West Australian Airways that had been set up by Norman Beardley in 1921 as Australia’s first scheduled air service, for £25,000 Ivan Holyman also approached Adelaide Steamship to amalgamate with his airline (operating between Victoria and Tasmania), aiming to form Australia's most powerful airline to effectively control airline traffic between Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. In 1936, the two companies merged and, along with orient Steam Navigation and Union Steam Ship Company of New Zealand, formed Australian National Airways (ANA) the giant among Australian domestic airlines before and after World War II. Adelaide Steamship retained part ownership in ANA until Holyman's death in 1957. The Australian National Airways board then unsuccessfully tried to sell out to the government-owned Trans Australia Airlines (TAA), before reaching agreement with Reg Ansett to sell the airline to him for £3.3 million.

Horrie Miller and Joe Larkin part of colourful 1920s birth of national airlines in Adelaide

Horrie Miller added to the colour of Adelaide aviation when he arrived in 1921, with a background as an Australian Air Corps war pilot and in barnstorming (stunt flying). He was an owner of Commercial Aviation Company, whose early flights around South Australia used a G-AUCF Armstrong-Whitworth FK8, later sold to the fledgling Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services (QANTAS) at Longreach. Miller set up operations at Harry Butler’s Hendon (Albert Park) aerodrome in Adelaide's west where, in 1924, the first Adelaide-Sydney airmail run started, involving another operator, the controversial Joe Larkin, in the early competitive days of Australian airlines. The airmail route was Adelaide-Mildura-Hay-Narrandera-Cootamundra-Sydney over 24 hours. In 1927, philanthropist and confectioner MacPherson Robertson helped Miller to set up another airline, MacPherson Miller Aviation, and used it to carry chocolates from Melbourne to Adelaide. Many other early flights were to carry medical emergencies: a precursor to the Royal Flying Doctor Service. MacPherson Robertson initially flew out of Hendon (Albert Park) and Parafield, where Miller was the first person to land. The Sydney-to-Perth air race used Parafield in October 1929 when 16 aircraft called in to refuel. Horrie Miller won the event on handicap in his DH9 G-AUHT. MacRobertson Miller Airlines was taken over by Ansett Airlines in 1963.

World War I kills Bill Wittber's plane venture but gets Harry Butler into sky to start airmail

Harry Butler became obsessed with flying during his boyhood on a farm and school at Koolywurtie near Minlaton. He’d heard about Bill Wittber and Fred Custance's flights in the Bolivar paddock in 1910, and on most Saturdays he travelled to Smithfield on a motorbike. On Margaret Smith’s property at Smithfield, Butler joined Bill Wittber, who had designed and built his own plane, including a six-cylinder radial engine (an Australian first). Taxi trials of the plane in 1915 produced longer and higher hops, but the venture ended when the government banned civilian aircraft flying after World War I broke out. Disgusted, Wittber dismantled and burnt his plane. Butler continued his interest in aviation and was finally accepted into the air force at Point Cook. Disappointed by slow progress, Butler went to England and joined the Royal Flying Corps. Excluded from the pilots' course by lack of education, he became a mechanic. His experience and knowledge were recognised and, by 1916, Second Lieutenant Butler was flying in France. Although wounded and twice awarded the Air Force Cross, he stayed in the Royal Flying Corps until 1919 when demobilised with the rank of captain. During the war, Butler solved the lack of communication experienced at the front by dropping messages from the air. This created the concept of air mail. Butler’s first actual air mail flight was in 1917 when he took letters from Glasgow to Turnberry. Butler put the airmail concept into practice with his own planes in South Australia after the war.

Harry Butler returns with Red Devil; sets up Adelaide's first airport Hendon at Albert Park

World War I pilot Harry Butler returned to Adelaide from England with a Bristol monoplane (the Red Devil) and an Avro 504-K. Butler gave stunt displays in the Red Devil and, in 1919, he took it on the first southern hemisphere over-water flight across St Vincent Gulf (108km) to his hometown Minlaton on Yorke Peninsula. Carrying a full mailbag, he was greeted by more than 6000 people. District council chairman Edward Correll received a special letter from state governor Henry Galway. Butler returned to Adelaide with two bags of mail and flew over his old school at Koolywurtie. Butler, with Harry Kauper, converted his Avro 504-4 to two seats and operated Captain Harry J. Butler & Kauper Aviation from a hangar at basic Northfield airfield. Butler bought 24ha at largely-rural Albert Park in Woodville district, and in 1920 set up Hendon, also known as Captain Butler's, aerodrome. With the aviation novelty wearing off, Butler closed the company in 1921. The federal defence department in 1922 bought what was first serious Adelaide airport until the shift to Parafield in 1927. Butler and his Red Devil created other firsts including an aerial photograph of Adelaide and taking people on flights over the city. In 1920, the Ross and Keith Smith returned to Adelaide in their Vickers-Vimy, escorted by Butler's Red Devil.That year, Butler won Australia's first aerial derby in Adelaide but crashed his Avro biplane near Minlaton in 1922. He survived and resumed flying and new businesses but died of a cerebral abscess in 1924. Thousands lined King William Street, Adelaide, to farewell to their hero at his funeral.

South Australia's Royal Aero Club trains young heroes; a bastion for state's wealthy families

Between 25,000 and 30,000 attended a Parafield air show in 1926 to celebrate the opening of the South Australian section of the Australian Aero Club: the Royal Aero Club of South Australia. Later that year, the club had defence department approval for the loan of two DH60 Gipsy Moths. In 1927, the club built a hangar and bought two aircraft for passenger transport and training. The club was at the forefront of Adelaide upper-class society and many of its members came from Adelaide’s wealthiest and best-known families. Two of club’s earliest members, Jimmy Melrose and Roy Gropler, benefited from its training and went on to become young long-distance solo flying heroes. A friend of Melrose, who was from South Australia's pastoral aristocracy, was Francis Marion Wright (nee Lunn) who gained her A pilot's licence through the Royal Aero Club, Parafield, in 1933. In 1934, she won the Ross Smith Trophy for the highest aggregate score in flying competitiions. When World War II broke out, she was not allowed to fly with the forces but became section leader in the Red Cross women's transport and, as an experienced mechanic, worked on servicing motor vehicles and aircraft at Parafield.

Daredevil pilot Chris Sperou dominates Australia and takes on world in aerobatics

Chris Sperou has won the Australian aerobatics championship 13 times and flown in five world aerobatic championships – using tricks he taught himself. Born in Thevenard on Eyre Peninsula’s west coast, Sperou was inspired in his schooldays by watching military planes staging through Ceduna to refuel. Barred by his parents from joining the air force, Sperou worked as a professional fisherman and then a refrigeration mechanic after moving to Adelaide. He joined the Royal Aero Club of South Australia as soon as he turned 21. He trained in DH 1 DeHavilland Chipmunk but soon went solo and quickly engaged in “unusual attitudes”: aerobatics. Sperou won his first national title without being endorsed to fly aerobatics. He represented the aero club in a three-man formation team, winning and helping to win the national title nine times, national aerobatic and unlimited title 13 times. In the world aerobatic titles, Sperou and Australia didn’t have the aircraft to match other countries but won a bronze medal in the USA in 1980. Sperou perfected an unlimited routine of low-level aerobatics in his Super Pitts special bi-plane with a generator trailing smoke. He was the first pilot in Australia approved to carry out the inverted ribbon cut: upside down at 10 metres above the ground and descending to seven metres above the ground to cut a ribbon stretched between two poles with his propeller. Sperou made regular appearances at the Formula One and Adelaide 500 car races. He did stunts for films including The Fire In The Stone  (1984), Run Chrissie Run (1986) and The Blue Lightning (1991). 

(Premier) Stateliner buses linking centres from Ceduna to Mount Gambier to Adelaide

Stateliner (previously Premier Stateliner) is the South Australia’s largest operator of bus services from Adelaide city's Central Bus Station in Franklin Street to country centres. Alan Crawford started the service in 1966 as Premier Roadlines. In 1980, it was bought and rebranded as Premier Stateliner, before becoming Stateliner in 2019, with 33 coaches. Stateliner operates services to/from Adelaide to Ceduna via Port Augusta; Mount Gambier; Port Lincoln via Port Augusta; Renmark and Loxton; and Whyalla via Port Augusta. These Eyre Peninsula, mid north and Riverland services span 110 towns, and Stateliner has offices in Port Lincoln, Whyalla, Port Pirie, Renmark and Adelaide, along with large network of Stateliner agents in most South Australian towns. LinkSA, taken over by national transport giant Keolis Downer (also operator of SouthLink metropolitan buses in Adelaide), runs a network of bus services from the Adelaide city to centres such as Murray Bridge, Goolwa/Victor Harbor, Barossa Valley, Murrayville and Mount Barker plus school and charter buses. The interstate-owned Murrays Coaches are among the other bigger operators offering bus hire, coach charter or limousine transfers in Adelaide and regional South Australia. Buses R Us has been another player in city-country links. Adelaide’s interstate bus services also leave from Central Bus Station. These are the Firefly Express (Adelaide to Sydney via Melbourne) and Greyhound Australia (Adelaide to Melbourne and Alice Springs, with onward connections).

Segway Sensation tours glide around Adelaide Riverbank, Glenelg and the Seppeltfield winery

Cindy Chynoweth and Shane Camilleri brought Segway Sensation to South Australia in 2014 after falling in love with the exhilarating experience of a two-wheeled self-balancing vehicle on a Sydney tour. They started Segway Sensation SA tours at Seppeltsfield winery in the Barossa Valley, before adding Adelaide city tours in 2017 and Glenelg in 2019. They also host corporate events and team building. Tours are about one hour long plus a short training session in driving the personal transporters. The Riverbank tour starts from the Par 3, North Adelaide Golf Course, before following a 6km trail taking in major attractions including Adelaide Oval, Adelaide Convention Centre, the Riverbank bridge, Adelaide Festival Centre and Adelaide Zoo. The 6km Glenelg trail takes in the Glenelg Beach foreshore, Mosley Square, Glenelg Jetty, Patawalonga Creek, boat docks and boat marina. The Seppeltsfield Winery tour visits areas of the estate not normally accessible in one of Australia's oldest wineries, founded in 1851 by Joseph Ernst Seppelt. From the Seppeltsfield picnic grounds, the tour heads off on a trail through heritage-listed sites and 19th Century Barossa architecture, tranquil gardens and vineyard vistas.

 

HandleBar Adelaide brings 16-passenger pedalling pub on wheels to Australia in 2016

The HandleBar Adelaide, Australia’s first pub on wheels, is a 16-passenger pedal-powered mobile music, fun and drinking experience, offering two-hour tours of the city centre. The HandleBar’s four-wheel open frame vehicles, devised by brothers Henk and Zwier Van Laar in the Netherlands in the 1990s, are totally powered by the pedalling passengers at just under 10km/h with the bar handler guiding its braking and direction. After the novelty was taken up in US, European and Asian cities, Adelaide gained the first of the vehicles (it now has four) in Australia in 2016. They were brought to Adelaide by Stephen Lindsay and Jason Seris who’d operated nine of the Amsterdam-made vehicles in the US since 2012. They chose Adelaide because of its smaller size where they’ve found the concept has most impact. They met extensively with the city council and state government agencies to ensures compliance in safety, food and alcohol service, waste disposal, suitable city routes and occasional stopping points. The two-hour tours around the Adelaide CBD allow passengers to enjoy a South Australian beer, cider or wine (that can be pre-ordered and prepaid online) to the background of their own karaoke playlist, with stops at other hotels along the way. A similar concept has been taken up by Glenelg Pedal Bar with an all-aluminium pedal vehicle starting and finishing at the Watermark Hotel, Glenelg (corner of Anzac Highway and Adelphi Terrace), then taking in beach tracks, visiting Moseley Square and Marina Pier bars. 

Variety Bash raises millions for South Australian children in need over its 30 years

The South Australian Variety Bash reached its 31st year in 2019, with around $40 million raised for state’s sick, disadvantaged or special-needs children by the fun event. The Variety Bash concept was created in 1985 by adventurer Dick Smith when he took a group of friends for a drive he called The Bourke to Burketown Bash that raised money for charity. South Australia adopted the concept in 1989 but with an emphasis on raising money for children in need through the Variety Club.. The Bash is generally an eight-day drive in the country. It is not a race or rally, more a madcap event designed to put the fun into fundraising. Vehicles taking part must be in standard condition and models with a minimum age of 25 years. As the only motoring event in Australia that supports children in need, the South Australian Bash always focused on not only raising money during the leadup and throughout the event but we also be stopping along the way to surprise schools and organisations with grants from Variety Club’s fundraising. Variety’s other motoring fundraiser is a six-day outback adventure taking 4WD vehicles and their owners off the bitumen and into the outback, but doing it in style. The emphasis is on good tracks, scenery, food and wine plus fun and entertainment. The 4WD Adventure is Variety SA’s second highest fundraiser behind the Bash, raising more than six million dollars. As with all Variety events, safety is a major consideration. Its experienced outback team includes a medical team, mechanics, 4WD experts, a radio communications vehicle, satellite phones and an aircraft. in.

Adelaide City E-scooter trial extends to added carbon savings in venture with EcoCaddy

Two electric scooter companies, Singapore-based Beam and Melbourne-based Ride, begin operating a six-month trial across Adelaide CBD in 2019. They were chosen by Adelaide City Council ahead of Californian company Lime that run a four-week pilot program with 500 scooters used for 140,000 trips during the Adelaide Fringe. The shortlisted operators were assessed on criteria, including ability to restrict an e-scooter’s speed and braking. The council said Lime didn’t meet requirements because it wouldn't force its e-scooters to stop if they went outside the council-imposed boundaries. GPS-tracked and operated with a smartphone app, the new e-scooters operating in Adelaide were required by the council to reduce to a speed of four kilometres per hour. The new permit is limited to the CBD. If riders go beyond this (or into Rundle Mall no-go zone), Beam and Ride’s e-scooters will slow to a stop. Ride scooters has become a partner of Adelaide-born micro-mobility company EcoCaddy that operates a CBD pedal-assisted electric bike passenger service. In a deal maximising their common aim of reducing carbon emissions, Ride scooters and EcoCaddy developed a battery swapping system. Instead of a truck picking up scooters each day to move them to in-demand pickup points or to the depot for recharging, the batteries are swapped by a mechanic on an EcoCaddy bike. An EcoCargo trailer was designed to carry scooters around. The partnership worked so well that Ride scooters and EcoCaddy were looking to take it to the national level.

Adelaide City E-scooter trial extends to added carbon savings in venture with EcoCaddy

Two electric scooter companies, Singapore-based Beam and Melbourne-based Ride, begin operating a six-month trial across Adelaide CBD in 2019. They were chosen by Adelaide City Council ahead of Californian company Lime that run a four-week pilot program with 500 scooters used for 140,000 trips during the Adelaide Fringe. The shortlisted operators were assessed on criteria, including ability to restrict an e-scooter’s speed and braking. The council said Lime didn’t meet requirements because it wouldn't force its e-scooters to stop if they went outside the council-imposed boundaries. GPS-tracked and operated with a smartphone app, the new e-scooters operating in Adelaide were required by the council to reduce to a speed of four kilometres per hour. The new permit is limited to the CBD. If riders go beyond this (or into Rundle Mall no-go zone), Beam and Ride’s e-scooters will slow to a stop. Ride scooters has become a partner of Adelaide-born micro-mobility company EcoCaddy that operates a CBD pedal-assisted electric bike passenger service. In a deal maximising their common aim of reducing carbon emissions, Ride scooters and EcoCaddy developed a battery swapping system. Instead of a truck picking up scooters each day to move them to in-demand pickup points or to the depot for recharging, the batteries are swapped by a mechanic on an EcoCaddy bike. An EcoCargo trailer was designed to carry scooters around. The partnership worked so well that Ride scooters and EcoCaddy were looking to take it to the national level.

EcoCaddy trikes bring hybrid electric short-trip taxi experience to Adelaide city centre

EcoCaddy, a short-trip passenger service for the Adelaide city centre, using bamboo-bodied hybrid-electric tricycles, is consolidating on its challenging start in 2015.  EcoCaddy’s founder Daniels Langeberg, whose qualifications include bachelor of urban and regional planning with first class honours at the University of South Australia, worked in Shanghai, helping design green cities. While racing fixed-gear bikes in China, Langeberg met Chris and Florence Trees, designers and makers of Treecycle: an electric-assisted pedal trike, built from steam-pressed bamboo and aluminium, that now comprises EcoCaddy’s fleet. Besides taking on Adelaide’s car obsession, Langeberg became Australia’s first pedicab company in Australia to provide riders with a wage, rather than commission, to retain drivers who match the culture of the venture. The wage system was propped up by advertising and sponsorship on the vehicles. Courier and delivery services are other sidelines, and EcoCaddy diversified into city and parklands tours. Dovetailing with Adelaide City Council carbon-neutral goals and its own eco-friendly philosophy, EcoCaddy struck a deal with Ride, an operator of e-scooters in the Adelaide CDB, to collect and recharge its scooters with a custom-built EcoCart. These extra revenue possibilities have allowed EcoCaddy to settle more comfortably into new headquarters in Pulteney Street, Adelaide. EcoCaddy’s short-trip taxi service operates on a $10 flat fee within the Adelaide City Council zone, includes the Adelaide city centre, North Adelaide and the parklands. 

EcoCaddy trikes bring hybrid electric short-trip taxi experience to Adelaide city centre

EcoCaddy, a short-trip passenger service for the Adelaide city centre, using bamboo-bodied hybrid-electric tricycles, is consolidating on its challenging start in 2015.  EcoCaddy’s founder Daniels Langeberg, whose qualifications include bachelor of urban and regional planning with first class honours at the University of South Australia, worked in Shanghai, helping design green cities. While racing fixed-gear bikes in China, Langeberg met Chris and Florence Trees, designers and makers of Treecycle: an electric-assisted pedal trike, built from steam-pressed bamboo and aluminium, that now comprises EcoCaddy’s fleet. Besides taking on Adelaide’s car obsession, Langeberg became Australia’s first pedicab company in Australia to provide riders with a wage, rather than commission, to retain drivers who match the culture of the venture. The wage system was propped up by advertising and sponsorship on the vehicles. Courier and delivery services are other sidelines, and EcoCaddy diversified into city and parklands tours. Dovetailing with Adelaide City Council carbon-neutral goals and its own eco-friendly philosophy, EcoCaddy struck a deal with Ride, an operator of e-scooters in the Adelaide CDB, to collect and recharge its scooters with a custom-built EcoCart. . These extra revenue possibilities have allowed EcoCaddy to settle more comfortably into new headquarters in Pulteney Street, Adelaide. EcoCaddy’s short-trip taxi service operates on a $10 flat fee within the Adelaide City Council zone, includes the Adelaide city centre, North Adelaide and the parklands. 

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