Makerspace Adelaide offers open access to tools/skills to explore ideas, resuse material

Makerspace Adelaide is available to individuals as well as business and industry.

Makerspace Adelaide, due to open in 2019 in Franklin Street in the city CBD, is an evolution of Fab Lab Adelaide, started in 2012. Funded through the state government’s Green Industries SA shared fabrication spaces infrastructure programme, the maker space provides anyone from the community with access to shared equipment, tools andpeople who have knowledge and networks.

People can develop skills and design, create, make and produce their ideas. The Adelaide Makerspace will promote the reuse, recovery and repurposing of materials to make the most of them – essential to creating a more circular economy.

The makerspace will enable the community to use skills in diverse areas such as welding, 3D printing, laser cutting, computer-assisted design and digital production. It will also offer workshops and training programs, as well as developing partnerships with industry, schools, academic institutions and the not-for-profit sector.

Since 2015, the volunteers behind the not-for-profit SA Makers organisation have been the driving force, fostering the maker movement in South Australia and producing the world-class Adelaide Maker Faire that became the largest event of its kind in Australia, although suspended in 2018.

Access to the Adelaide Makerspace is available to individuals as well as business and industry, enabling skills development and access to equipment needed for to create rapid prototypes and concepts. The maker movement, described as the “new industrial revolution”, sees the diversity of users is its biggest strength, bringing together people from all walks of life, industries and backgrounds.

A South Australian North East (SANE) Makerspace is also based at suburban Holden Hill  while related skill-sharing groups include Hackerspace Adelaide, Hackerspace@Tonsely, and The Adelaide Remakery.

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Alfred Simpson starts Adelaide industrial dynasty in 1853 making pots, pans and cans

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