Ludwik Dutkiewicz and Ian Davidson's 'Time in summer' (1968) gets to the Berlin Film Festival

Time in Summer was an Adelaide experimental film, produced, written and photographed by Ian Davidson and directed by Ludwik Dutkiewicz.

Half a century to the day after The woman suffers premiered in 1918, the next South Australian feature film, Ludwik Dutkiewicz’s Time in Summer (1968), appeared. Although the film enjoyed a prestigious screening at the 1968 Berlin Film Festival, it failed to attract commercial interest.

The experimental narrative film, produced, written and photographed by Ian Davidson and directed by Dutkiewicz, explored the subjective experiences of a girl during her first romance, and of her brother as he lies near death after a car accident. Christina O’Brien and Peter Ross led the cast.

Davidson and Dutkiewicz made two other films: Reflections (1964) and Transfiguration (1965) that received an AFI award for best black and white photography.

Davidson was influenced at an early age by films seen in Adelaide in the late 1940s – William Wyler’s The Best years of our lives, Olivier’s Hamlet, The Third man and Kazan’s Boomerang – and by the writings of Jean Cocteau, Eisenstein, and modern authors like William Faulkner and James Joyce. In the 1950s he was further influenced by the work of dramatists (particularly Lorca) seen in “visionary” productions in Adelaide and expanded his literary horizons in Mary Martin’s bookshop that, under Max Harris, was a gathering place for those exploring modernism.

In 1955, Davidson met painter and multi-media experimental artist Stan Ostoja-Kotkowski and soon after brothers Wlad and Ludwik Dutkiewicz who founded the Arts Studio Players.

Ludwik Dutkiewicz was among South Australian painters featured in the documentary film Painting 1950-1955 South Australia, directed by Ostoja-Kotkowski. He belonged to the progressive alliance known as The Adelaide Group, that exhibited in Adelaide, Sydney and Melbourne in the 1950s. He lectured for several years at the South Australian School of Art.

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